FEAR (False Evidence Appearing Real). Yes Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate, we are more endowed than we thought. When afraid, we have no reason to push harder, be distinctive, live beyond the limits, but to settle for less. Goals remain at their state of inertia unless you strive to reach out to them. If you can dream it, you can achieve it. If your fear has ever been ‘not meeting targets, face it and they will be met’. Is it failure? Prepare ahead of the task and you will attain success. Rejection? Strategize so hard and you will be sort after. Is yours being ignored at ideas? Don’t give up you will soon be noticed. Fears are meant to be faced and by that you unlock potentials and virtues. You have all it takes to reach your goals, your productivity is only affected by the unreal (fear). “For God hath not given us the spirit of fear, but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind” (2 Timothy 1:7). Fear can be conceptualized into dual views; either you are afraid of failure or afraid of success.

When afraid of failure, you’re worried of getting results below the expected, ‘cos you have harbored flaws and inferiority. Fear of success gives a picture of incompetence when your goals are met, feelings of not having what it takes to maintain those goals, feeling intimidated by your colleagues at the same horizon, insecurity, also when the environment (norm) has set a limit to your potentials and strength. When afraid of failure, remember success as an indispensable alternative. Likewise, when afraid of success remember the picture (incompetence) ain’t real, you’ve got all it takes to sustain it. Fears are not real … Don’t give up, you are much closer than you’ve thought. Always focus on winning because ‘real champions always focus on winning’ (anonymous). Face your fear. I believe in you.

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